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These six videos provide perspectives from, respectively, the disciplines of clinical psychology, history, law, philosophy, physics and statistics on how each discipline deals with the unknown. Understanding and responding to unknowns does not fall neatly within a single discipline. Instead, different disciplines have different ways of thinking about and dealing with unknowns and there is […]
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The ethical matrix provides a structured process for identifying, weighing and integrating different, and potentially conflicting, values among the various stakeholders concerned with an issue or problem. The matrix has three principles – well-being, autonomy and justice – on the horizontal axis, with the various stakeholders affected by the problem and decision-making listed on the […]
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Describes the importance of feedback loops and how they can cause unexpected events in complex systems, using marine multiple use management as an example. Reference: Fulton, B. (2013). Anticipating the unexpected, digital poster #687 from the First Global Conference on Research Integration and Implementation held in Canberra, Australia, online and at three co-conferences (Lueneburg in […]
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Focused dialogue is the collaborative construction of powerful ideas. These ideas are essentially simple, generic and fundamental concepts which, once developed between people, can serve to build the shared understanding essential for effective communication and successful integration. Developing focused dialogue involves a number of discrete steps: 1. Identifying “the terms that will play a key […]
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Purpose: To provide an introduction to creating powerful messages, also known as ‘framing.’  Description: Key elements of framing are highlighted. The characteristics of a good frame are: It is ‘sticky’ – in other words the message is powerful and simple The person hearing or seeing it intuitively agrees with it There is a ‘villain’, i.e., […]
In this classic introduction to framing, Lakoff argues that: “Frames are mental structures that shape the way we see the world. As a result they shape the goals we seek, the plans we make, the way we act, and what counts as a good or bad outcome of our actions. In politics our frames shape […]
Argues for the importance of differentiating between the initial adoption of research findings and long-term use, and suggests that focusing only on adoption is the single biggest impediment to achieving impact. Adoption is defined as “the willingness and ability to take research results and convert them into something that’s usable more broadly”, which can involve […]
Describes eight principles for implementation-oriented research: Joint agenda setting to allow for effective engagement of societal actors from business, industry, government and civil society to identify the problems Co-design, co-production, co-delivery and co-interpretation to allow the full integration of knowledge and experiences of stakeholders as well as joint interpretation and communication of the results. Process-oriented […]
These four brief videos provide an introduction to implementation of evidence-based practice, drawn from experience in children's mental health organisations and schools. They cover: 1. A general overview, emphasising the importance of preparation and planning for implementation. 2. The importance of involving a team in the service provision agency to be the “champions of change”, responsible for planning, executing and monitoring the implementation. The video also covers key factors in choosing the team. 3. The importance of providing coaching by an intervention expert on how to put new skills into practice, so that those implementing the new skills are supported and given feedback. 4. The concept of fidelity, which is about delivering the evidence based intervention as intended by the intervention developer. This includes differentiating between key ingredients and those where discretion is permissible.
Argues that the know-do gap arises because restrictions facing stakeholders are not taken into account. Identifies an iterative five-step heuristic for doing this: Define options for the actors Identify the network of direct and indirect actors Develop a concept for analysing the conditions of action and their underlying functional logic Conduct an empirical analysis of […]

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