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Purpose: To create the right conditions for dialogue Description: Nine key dynamics in a dialogue are 1) building a safe space, 2) openness, 3) respect, 4) storytelling, 5) listening, 6) suspending automatic response, judgment, and certainty, 7) collaborative inquiry, 8) finding common ground and exploring differences and 9) balancing advocacy and inquiry.  Building a safe space: […]
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Purpose: Nominal group technique is a special-purpose method for problem solving or idea generation. It taps and combines individual judgments to arrive at decisions that could not be determined by one person. It is not a tool for routine meetings or for negotiating or bargaining. It is not a tool for routine meetings or for negotiating or bargaining. Instead it is a technique for judgmental or creative decision making where there is lack of agreement or an incomplete state of knowledge about either the nature of the problem or about what is required to reach a successful solution.
Purpose: To provide a way of effectively integrating different interests by finding a mutually agreeable fair solution through a problem solving approach. Description: Principled negotiation has four steps: (1) separate the people from the problem; (2) focus on interests, not positions; (3) generate a variety of possibilities before deciding what to do; (4) look for a fair solution, based on the merits.
These six videos provide perspectives from, respectively, the disciplines of clinical psychology, history, law, philosophy, physics and statistics on how each discipline deals with the unknown. Understanding and responding to unknowns does not fall neatly within a single discipline. Instead, different disciplines have different ways of thinking about and dealing with unknowns and there is […]
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The ethical matrix provides a structured process for identifying, weighing and integrating different, and potentially conflicting, values among the various stakeholders concerned with an issue or problem. The matrix has three principles – well-being, autonomy and justice – on the horizontal axis, with the various stakeholders affected by the problem and decision-making listed on the […]
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Focused dialogue is the collaborative construction of powerful ideas. These ideas are essentially simple, generic and fundamental concepts which, once developed between people, can serve to build the shared understanding essential for effective communication and successful integration. Developing focused dialogue involves a number of discrete steps: 1. Identifying “the terms that will play a key […]
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Purpose: To provide an introduction to creating powerful messages, also known as ‘framing.’  Description: Key elements of framing are highlighted. The characteristics of a good frame are: It is ‘sticky’ – in other words the message is powerful and simple The person hearing or seeing it intuitively agrees with it There is a ‘villain’, i.e., […]
In this classic introduction to framing, Lakoff argues that: “Frames are mental structures that shape the way we see the world. As a result they shape the goals we seek, the plans we make, the way we act, and what counts as a good or bad outcome of our actions. In politics our frames shape […]
These four brief videos provide an introduction to implementation of evidence-based practice, drawn from experience in children's mental health organisations and schools. They cover: 1. A general overview, emphasising the importance of preparation and planning for implementation. 2. The importance of involving a team in the service provision agency to be the “champions of change”, responsible for planning, executing and monitoring the implementation. The video also covers key factors in choosing the team. 3. The importance of providing coaching by an intervention expert on how to put new skills into practice, so that those implementing the new skills are supported and given feedback. 4. The concept of fidelity, which is about delivering the evidence based intervention as intended by the intervention developer. This includes differentiating between key ingredients and those where discretion is permissible.
A useful analytical framework for assessing knowledge co-production consists of the following elements: “typology of actor roles, research phases, objectives and forms of actor integration, and types of knowledge” (see figure below). The framework was used to analyse “what types of actors contributed what kind of knowledge in which research phase” in four transdisciplinary studies […]

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