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Framing and metaphors

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Purpose: This curated online directory, called Public Design Vault, aims to provide an "all-in-one, a full-stop one-stop, a mother list of lists, a singularity for the plethora of toolkits and resources that are available on the vast internet." It aims to include "all the well-known usual suspects" as well as "a few diamonds in the rough."
Purpose: To provide an introduction to creating powerful messages, also known as ‘framing.’  Description: Key elements of framing are highlighted. The characteristics of a good frame are: It is ‘sticky’ – in other words the message is powerful and simple The person hearing or seeing it intuitively agrees with it There is a ‘villain’, i.e., […]
In this classic introduction to framing, Lakoff argues that: “Frames are mental structures that shape the way we see the world. As a result they shape the goals we seek, the plans we make, the way we act, and what counts as a good or bad outcome of our actions. In politics our frames shape […]
Conceptual metaphors help make integrative research more successful. They require “deep and continued dialogue,” a shared context for communication, and iteration until shared meaning is established. Conceptual metaphors contrast with conduit metaphors, which assume that words and sentences on their own can convey thoughts and feelings. Conduit metaphors lead to an illusion of communication, but […]
Metaphors help people “understand the unfamiliar” and “make someone realise they’ve only been looking at one side of a thing.” Metaphors assist in closing “the gap in people’s ability to grasp something, or speed up what they’re already on track to see.” Designing metaphors involves generating multiple possible comparisons to find those that work well. […]

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