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Engagement

Displaying 1 - 10 of 23
Purpose: To provide a process for describing and further assessing propositions, which are “proposals on best practice that have a solid evidence base but remain contested.” Description: The development of propositions has two phases: an initial phase, where “a small group of researchers and practitioners define a set of evidence-based insights and counterview for a […]
Purpose: To demonstrate how games based on models can assist decision making and change on complex problems. Description: This video demonstrates how well-designed games, with skilled facilitation, empower players to make better decisions. When those with power to make change are the players, games can assist in finding innovative ways to make progress on difficult […]
Purpose: To systematically solicit and collate expert judgments on a particular topic, which also provides a structured way for the experts to build on each other’s ideas. Description: Each expert is asked for their judgment on a topic using a questionnaire or interview; this does not require the experts to meet. The responses are collated and summarised and returned to the experts before proceeding with a second round of questions about the topic, often leading to voting on a particular question...
The Design Exchange provides is a website “where designers and researchers share methods and best practices”. Method categories are: Build, including activity modelling, dark horse, storyboarding and various kinds of prototyping Analyze, including pictorial storytelling, social network analysis, context map and powers of ten Ideate, including dot voting, spectrum mapping, 6-3-5 brainwriting and participatory co-design […]
Purpose: Nominal group technique is a special-purpose method for problem solving or idea generation. It taps and combines individual judgments to arrive at decisions that could not be determined by one person. It is not a tool for routine meetings or for negotiating or bargaining. It is not a tool for routine meetings or for negotiating or bargaining. Instead it is a technique for judgmental or creative decision making where there is lack of agreement or an incomplete state of knowledge about either the nature of the problem or about what is required to reach a successful solution.
Describes eight principles for implementation-oriented research: Joint agenda setting to allow for effective engagement of societal actors from business, industry, government and civil society to identify the problems Co-design, co-production, co-delivery and co-interpretation to allow the full integration of knowledge and experiences of stakeholders as well as joint interpretation and communication of the results. Process-oriented […]
These four brief videos provide an introduction to implementation of evidence-based practice, drawn from experience in children's mental health organisations and schools. They cover: 1. A general overview, emphasising the importance of preparation and planning for implementation. 2. The importance of involving a team in the service provision agency to be the “champions of change”, responsible for planning, executing and monitoring the implementation. The video also covers key factors in choosing the team. 3. The importance of providing coaching by an intervention expert on how to put new skills into practice, so that those implementing the new skills are supported and given feedback. 4. The concept of fidelity, which is about delivering the evidence based intervention as intended by the intervention developer. This includes differentiating between key ingredients and those where discretion is permissible.
Argues that the know-do gap arises because restrictions facing stakeholders are not taken into account. Identifies an iterative five-step heuristic for doing this: Define options for the actors Identify the network of direct and indirect actors Develop a concept for analysing the conditions of action and their underlying functional logic Conduct an empirical analysis of […]
A useful analytical framework for assessing knowledge co-production consists of the following elements: “typology of actor roles, research phases, objectives and forms of actor integration, and types of knowledge” (see figure below). The framework was used to analyse “what types of actors contributed what kind of knowledge in which research phase” in four transdisciplinary studies […]
Purpose: To describe open knowledge systems. Description: Open knowledge systems are required to deal with accelerating global change, the danger of crossing planetary boundaries, multiple and interacting pressures, as well as the consequences of partial solutions for one problem leading to pressures elsewhere. The transformative change required to deal with these earth system challenges needs cooperation and dialogue between the scientific community and all other stakeholders ie., those with relevant knowledge for contributing to solutions. This is what is meant by an open knowledge system.

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