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These four brief videos provide an introduction to implementation of evidence-based practice, drawn from experience in children's mental health organisations and schools. They cover: 1. A general overview, emphasising the importance of preparation and planning for implementation. 2. The importance of involving a team in the service provision agency to be the “champions of change”, responsible for planning, executing and monitoring the implementation. The video also covers key factors in choosing the team. 3. The importance of providing coaching by an intervention expert on how to put new skills into practice, so that those implementing the new skills are supported and given feedback. 4. The concept of fidelity, which is about delivering the evidence based intervention as intended by the intervention developer. This includes differentiating between key ingredients and those where discretion is permissible.
A new discipline – Integration and Implementation Sciences (i2S) – could provide a systematic way to allow people to effectively mix-and-match concepts and methods from systems thinking, inter- and trans-disciplinarity, implementation science, team science, complexity science and other approaches to more effectively deal with complex real-world problems. i2S has three domains: 1) synthesis of disciplinary […]
This video overview of interdisciplinarity identifies major developments over a century of work in an expanding variety of contexts, the communities of practices that emerged, and current trendlines. (Interdisciplinarity is nearing its 100th anniversary, dating from the earliest documented uses of the term in the early 20th century.) The overview then weighs implications of common […]
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This open-access book provides “practical guidance on how to conduct interdisciplinary research effectively with multi-member teams operating across departments and institutions.” Chapters are: Signposts for interdisciplinary travellers: introduction and some tips for reading this book Departure point: our approach to interdisciplinarity Planning the expedition: designing interdisciplinary research projects Making the expedition a success: managing interdisciplinary […]
Purpose: To describe open knowledge systems. Description: Open knowledge systems are required to deal with accelerating global change, the danger of crossing planetary boundaries, multiple and interacting pressures, as well as the consequences of partial solutions for one problem leading to pressures elsewhere. The transformative change required to deal with these earth system challenges needs cooperation and dialogue between the scientific community and all other stakeholders ie., those with relevant knowledge for contributing to solutions. This is what is meant by an open knowledge system.
Recent technological advances provide comprehensive digital traces of social actions, interactions, and transactions and are described in this video. These data provide an unprecedented exploratorium to model the socio-technical motivations for creating, maintaining, dissolving, and reconstituting into teams. This presentation uses examples from research on scientific collaboration and massively multiplayer online games to argue that […]
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Purpose: To introduces a range of tools for being more influential in bringing about evidence-based policy and practice change. Description: The following tools are briefly introduced in the video: Context, evidence and links framework Alignment, interest and influence matrix Outcome mapping Force-field analysis SWOT (Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis After action review Stories of change. […]
We live in an increasingly interconnected world where there are few simple policy solutions to complex, often “wicked” problems, and an increasing number of stakeholders with multiple, often divergent incentives are involved in decision-making. While there is often convincing research-based evidence about what works and what doesn’t work, there is no simple mechanism to translate […]
“For policy to bring positive change to people, it needs to be informed by the best available evidence and local knowledge. Producing robust evidence is just part of the policy change; we need to look at where that evidence is – or isn’t – being used by governments, and why. And while we have seen […]
Jeremy Heimans compares what he calls “new power” with “old power”. New power examples such as Airbnb, Kickstarter, LinkedIn and the Obama (USA) Presidency campaign, involve the deployment of mass participation and peer coordination, value transparency and networked governance and work like an electric current.

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