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Systems archetypes are recurring generic systems structures found in many kinds of organisations, under many circumstances, and at many levels and scales. They are distinctive combinations of reinforcing and balancing processes. These system archetypes teach how to diagnose recurring problems and to design effective interventions.

This resource archive covers system dynamics modeling; agent-based modeling; and social network analysis. It contains videos, slides, lecture details, and bibliographies from the Institute on Systems Science and Health (ISSH).

The Team Science website provides four education modules. The module on team science covers: 1) team conflicts and resolutions, 2) incentives and disincentives to collaborative research, 3) communication techniques and 4) evaluation methods.

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The Team Science Toolkit is a “user-generated collection of information and resources that support the practice and study of team science.” It is hosted by the National Cancer Institute at the US National Institutes of Health. The toolkit has resources relevant for many kinds of team work. The toolkit features:

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The concepts of trading zones and interactional expertise provide useful ways of thinking about and improving collaborations across very different disciplinary communities, such as materials science, social psychology and ethics.

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Transboundary competence involves the ability to deal with diversity and to cross the boundaries that divide perspectives. Seven key boundaries and useful approaches to cross them are shown in the following table:

 

This review of core competencies that need to be taught to develop transdisciplinary research includes:

Transdisciplinary research is based on the objects of integration and implementation. The research process aims to create space for common thinking, mutual learning and joint action between partners from diverse disciplines and societal fields in order to create knowledge, understanding and induce transformation.

The problem of dealing with unknowns does not reside in any one discipline. Instead, it inhabits many disciplines. Nearly all disciplines and practice domains have perspectives on the unknown, and their perspectives employ methods ranging from mathematics to discourse analysis.

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This taxonomy distinguishes between passive and active ignorance. Passive ignorance involves areas that we are ignorant of, whereas active ignorance refers to areas we ignore. The term ‘error’ is used for the unknowns encompassed by passive ignorance and ‘irrelevance’ for active ignorance.

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