Policy and Practice Support

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A useful analytical framework for assessing knowledge co-production consists of the following elements: “(1) typology of actor roles, (2) research phases, (3) objectives and forms of actor integration, and (4) types of knowledge” (see figure below).

The methods in the td-net toolbox for co-producing knowledge are useful for bringing together different perspectives on a problem, recognising that not only individuals but also social groups have different ways of thinking about issues.

Responding to the persistent problems of unsustainability and other global challenges needs a transformation of the knowledge system as a whole. As this video describes, this includes a transformation in research funding and in education.

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"This toolkit describes a range of tools that CSOs [Civil Society Organisations] might use to understand and map political context, in order to engage more effectively in policy processes. This guide introduces a series of tools that have been designed to map various dimensions of political context.

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Conceptual metaphors help make integrative research more successful. They require "deep and continued dialogue," a shared context for communication, and iteration until shared meaning is established.

Metaphors help people "understand the unfamiliar" and "make someone realise they've only been looking at one side of a thing." Metaphors assist in closing "the gap in people's ability to grasp something, or speed up what they're already on track to see."

Views integration as having “communicative, social and cognitive” aspects, relating to language, roles and knowledge, respectively.

This report provides a brief overview of the most popular modelling techniques used to analyse complex real-world problems, as well as some less popular but highly relevant techniques. The modelling methods are divided into three categories, with each encompassing a number of methods, as follows:

Demonstrates modelling scenarios and strategies for sustainable agriculture in an Austrian region. This involved gathering mental models of stakeholders, developing shared understanding of system dynamics, fostering exchange and learning, and developing and assessing strategies.

This case demonstrates the use of participatory research to bring together pastoralists, donors and researchers to build the capacity of the pastoralists to better withstand drought and similar shocks. The case is part of the Pastoral Risk Management (PARIMA) project of the Global Livestock Collaborative Research Support Program (GL-CRSP).

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