Completed projects

(Current projects are available under 'What is I2S?'):

  1. Detailed description of Integration and Implementation Sciences (I2S)
  2. Proof-of-concept project for the I2S Development Drive, around compiling dialogue methods
  3. Collaboration with the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center on "Building resources for complex, action-oriented team science".

Other completed projects are  grouped by the three domains of I2S and predominantly focus on publications produced in those projects:

  1. Synthesising disciplinary and stakeholder knowledge;
  2. Understanding and managing diverse unknowns; and,
  3. Providing integrated research support for policy and practice change.

 

1. Detailed description of Integration and Implementation Sciences (I2S)

Integration and Implementation Sciences (I2S) is described in the book Disciplining Interdisciplinarity: Integration and Implementation Sciences for Researching Complex Real-World Problems published in January 2013 by ANU E-Press.

This book helps collaborative research teams address complex real-world problems like widespread poverty, global climate change, organised crime, and escalating health care costs. It provides a systematic approach to:

  1. Synthesising disciplinary and stakeholder knowledge,
  2. Understanding and managing diverse unknowns, and
  3. Providing integrated research support for policy and practice change.

Each of these three domains is organized around five questions:

  1. For what and for whom?
  2. Which knowledge, unknowns and aspects of policy or practice?
  3. How?
  4. Context?
  5. Outcome?

This simple framework lays the foundations for developing compilations of concepts, methods and case studies about applying systems thinking, scoping and boundary setting, framing, dealing with values, harnessing and managing differences, undertaking dialogue, building models, applying common metrics, accepting unknowns, advocacy, engagement with policy and practice, understanding authorization, dealing with organizational facilitators and barriers, and much more.

The book makes a case for a new research style (integrative applied research) and a new discipline (Integration and Implementation Sciences or I2S) and advocates for progressing these through an I2S Development Drive. It builds on theory and practice-based research in multi-, inter- and trans-disciplinarity, post-normal science, systemic intervention, integrated assessment, sustainability science, team science, mode 2, action research and other approaches.

The book concludes with 24 commentaries by Simon Bronitt; L. David Brown; Marcel Bursztyn and Maria Beatriz Maury (read their commentary in its original Portugese (PDF 75KB)); Lawrence Cram; Ian Elsum; Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski; Fasihuddin; Howard Gadlin and L. Michelle Bennett; Budi Haryanto; Julie Thompson Klein; Ted Lefroy; Catherine Lyall; M. Duane Nellis; Linda Neuhauser, Deborah O’Connell with Damien Farine, Michael O’Connor and Michael Dunlop; Michael O’Rourke; Christian Pohl; Merritt Polk; Alison Ritter; Alice Roughley; Michael Smithson; Daniel Walker; Michael Wesley; Glenn Withers. These begin a process of appraisal, discussion and debate across diverse networks.

This project was funded by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security.

 

2. Proof-of-concept project for the I2S Development Drive: Compiling dialogue methods

As the report of the  dialogue methods project (PDF 300KB) describes, we started by reviewing the literature and in 2009 published a compilation of dialogue methods (McDonald, D., Bammer, G., Deane P. 2009. Research Integration Using Dialogue Methods, ANU E-Press). Subsequently (2010-2011) we assessed the feasibility of using an on-line forum to increase the number of methods and cases in the compilation. This project was funded by the Drug Policy Modelling Program and the ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security.

 

3. Collaboration with the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center on "Building resources for complex, action-oriented team science."

SESYNC is the US National Science Foundation-funded National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center at the University of Maryland and is located in Annapolis, USA. SESYNC funds projects, called pursuits, that fit into a theme relevant to socio-environmental synthesis. SESYNC funded a theme Building Resources for Complex, Action-Oriented Team Science led by Professor Gabriele Bammer which was the home for three pursuits:

Members of each pursuit met 3-4 times between 2015 and 2018. Several publications will result from each pursuit. A major activity of the theme was the development of the Integration and Implementation Insights blog, with pursuit members playing a major role in establishing the blog.  Additional information is available on how the theme was established.
 

4. Synthesising disciplinary and stakeholder knowledge (publications arising from completed projects)

McDonald, D., Bammer, G., Deane P. 2009. Research Integration Using Dialogue Methods, ANU E-Press. This book is available free online. Its development was funded by Land & Water Australia and the Drug Policy Modelling Program.

Moore D., Dray A., Green R., Hudson S.L., Jenkinson R., Siokou C., Perez P., Bammer G., Maher L., Dietze, P. (2009). Extending drug ethno-epidemiology using agent-based modelling. Addiction, 104: 1991-1997. This collaborative project was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). 

 

5. Understanding and managing diverse unknowns (publications arising from completed projects)

Bammer, G. (ed). 2010. Dealing with Uncertainties in Policing Serious Crime, ANU E-Press. This book is available free on-line. This project was funded by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security.

Bammer, G. and M. Smithson (eds). 2008. Uncertainty and Risk: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, London: Earthscan. This project was funded by Drug Policy Modelling Program.
 

6. Providing integrated research support for policy and practice change (publications arising from completed projects)

Bammer, G. (ed) 2015 Change! Combining analytic approaches with street wisdom. ANU Press. This book is available free online. This project was funded by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security. Eighteen disciplinary experts and practitioners participated, covering advertising, advocacy, anthropology, art, conservation-restoration, demography, economics, education, evolutionary biology, industry, international relations, organisational change, philosophy, politics, psychiatry, security-related intelligence, sociology, and sustainability science.

Bammer, G., with Michaux, A., and A. Sanson (eds). (2010). Bridging the ‘Know-Do’ Gap: Knowledge brokering to improve child wellbeing. ANU E-Press. This book is available free on-line. This book arose from a collaboration with the Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth and the Benevolent Society.

Bammer, G.; Strazdins, L.; McDonald, D.; Berry, H.; Ritter, A.; Deane, P.; van Kerkhoff, L. (2010). ‘Expanding the deliberations about the research-policy gap: useful lessons from the literature’ In Bammer, G., with Michaux, A., and A. Sanson (eds) Bridging the ‘Know-Do’ Gap: Knowledge brokering to improve child wellbeing. ANU E-Press, 135- 155; (available on-line (PDF 271KB)).

Ritter, A. and Bammer, G. (2010). 'Models of policy making and their relevance for drug research'. Drug and Alcohol Review, 29: 352-357. This project was funded by Drug Policy Modelling Program.

Bammer, G.; Ritter, A.; Deane, P.; Strazdins, L.; McDonald, D.; Berry, H.; van Kerkhoff, L. (2007). Improving research support for environmental policy making: lessons from the literature and issues for debate (PDF 112KB). Unpublished report prepared for the Global Environmental Change and Food Systems (GECAFS) project.

 

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